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20130118
20130118
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
category. the house looking to vote on raising the debt ceiling next week looking for a temporary, temporary three month increase. coming up we will find out what representative thinks about the plan and why she is looking to get rid of the debt ceiling all together. liz: plus we have the bond king of canada who knows plenty about our markets. five years ago he said that investors had the opportunity of a lifetime to buy stocks, just as we hit bottom, and we saw that bubble explode. well, he was right. now, what is he saying? 2013 holds the second buy of a lifetime? what is it? and how can you take advantage of it? he is here to talk about it. david: liz has that interview all to herself because i can't begin to pronounce his name. let's tell you what drove the markets. mixed day on wall street with s&p and dow closing in the green. all three major indices ending the week higher. industrials and energy were today's top performing sectors while technology was the only sector ending the day lower. and oil ending the week in the green after the international energy agency raised its
, there is a debt ceiling vote. now you hear a lot of republicans making noises about backing down from the debt ceiling fight. it is interesting by the way, i know we're not here to talk about that. it is interesting how the conventional wisdom has shifted on that. >> jennifer: quickly too. >> so quickly. just another sign of the shifting sands. it all hinges on how public opinion turns. and you know, is the president going to go out on the stump? is he going to go out and barnstorm the country for his proposals? how much political capital is he going to put into it? if he really builds up public support for the proposals and public support grows and if they feel pressure, he'll bring a vote. >> >> jennifer: just to take you back to that -- not the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling issue that the republicans do seem to be going soft on, i do think one of the reasons why they went so soft is because major traditionally republican lobbying groups were advocating like the chamber of commerce came out strongly saying this is crazy. i'm wondering if there are other traditionally republican groups like
: shocking. [ laughter ] we do have breaking news. learning a vote on the debt ceiling coming as early as next week. the details of the bill and reaction from peter welch straight ahead. ashley: one american remains missing in the u.s. says they will not go she ate hostage swap with terrorists. stephen hadley is our special guest this hour. ashley: energy companies facing off against a formidable opponent. they are losing. ashley: do not mess with the chicken. that is all i will say. especially with the prairie chicken. time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides. nicole: we are not to far off the unchanged line. you sneeze and you are in the positive territory. intel has been weighing on the dow jones industrials. that has been one of the things holding them back. the s&p 500 right around the five year highs but pulling back as well. we have had earnings. you have morgan stanley moving to a 52 week high and seeing profits rising in the future. that was some positive comments there from morgan stanley. it is up 7.7%. that is nothing to sneeze about. a winner. gener
: retreating or regrouping? house republicans putting to a vote raising the debt ceiling for three months, but are they backing off of their demands for spending cuts in exchange for raising the debt limit? with more on this, grover norquist, president for americans for tax reform. great to have you here. other republicans doing the right thing? >> i think so. there are three tools the republicans have to force obama to focus on spending, which she does not want to do it and will do unless forced. first is the sequester which starts march 1st or 2nd. that is a hundred billion dollars per year. that is the real cut in spending that will happen. the other one is the continuing resolution which starts march 4/7. we have a continuing resolution. they are the republicans that can put obama on a very short leash and only give him a continuing resolution for a week for two or three. cut the spending each time. those are two very powerful mechanisms. gerri: you don't in addition of the purse strings on the debt ceiling to use that at the a lever and give the president to stop spending? >> i didn'
own terms an increase in the debt ceiling of $1.5 trillion in two years. the budget they voted for requires the debt ceiling to be raised. and now when the time comes to avoid default, they don't want to do it. but i think what you're seeing is speaker boehner knows this isn't a viable tactic. i think mr. ryan knows it's not a viable tactic. but there's a lot in the republican conference that continue to see this doomsday kind of approach as a viable approach. and i think that cooler heads are starting to prevail on the republican side. and that's a good thing. >> and you are part of this no labels coalition wanting to reach across the aisle. but let me read to you what david brooks wrote. polarization is too deep, special interests are too strong. the negotiators are too rusty. republicans are not going to give up their vision of a low-tax america. democrats are not willing to change the current entitlement programs. so realistically, do you really believe that the next four years are going to be different than the last four years? >> well, you know, i don't have a prediction.
to the debt ceiling perhaps in a few months. he says he is not sure when the timing of that vote would be, he only says sooner rather than later. connell: republicans have become of this retrieve a message that resonates with working people and says william berg is just group therapy. chris used to be al gore's press secretary, says the spectrum represented right here. i will allow you to go first for a little bit of fun. what do you mean by that? >> after the election were told republicans were going to do some soul-searching for the record low numbers of minorities that had voted. what we're seeing now, just heari justheard a few moments ar program that half the country holds a negative view of the republican party and the tea party is having its lowest level rating in history itself. this is a party right now that is in some serious, serious trouble. unfortunately it doesn't seem as though they're taking a very serious approach to addressing the issues in the country. it is good they have had a good first step agreeing on the debt ceiling, but it seems to be only a first step. connell: the
had word that gop controlled house might have a deal. might vote next week to raise the debt ceiling for even three months. there is a very muted reaction and what to watch here are how people are buying etfs. this is the s&p 500. you can buy it in a single stock and you might say, oh, gee, there is a move there to the far right on the upside when the announcement came. but it is a very, very narrow amplitude. very narrow range of trading. that's about three points on the s&p 500. the volume did pick up and we will have volume towards the heavy side today. if you think that is good news pushing the debt ceiling out for stocks and i think generally would you look at it as good news, it certainly is fairly muted here. as for the major indices for the week, what simon was just talking about, there are deeper cyclical changes. big industrial names have been generally outperforming and that is very good news, if you think the global economy, those stocks would more closer would the global economy. >> you get this, this real tight hugging of the flat line friday. monday, tuesday, wednesday
the debt ceiling for three months until april 15. but there's a catch: they say within that time the senate and the house must pass budgets outlining their spending priorities for the year. now, that may not sound very difficult, but as republicans like to point out, senate democrats haven't passed a budget since 2009 and republicans say if they don't do so by april 15 then all members of congress should stop getting paid. >> pelley: but, nancy, why would the republicans abandon their demand for dollar-for-dollar spending cuts in exchange for raising the limit? >> well, in part they were worried about getting the blame if there was a default. this way they shift the burden to senate democrats to come up with a budget and they can still call for more spending cuts in three months when this comes up again. in the meantime, everyone gets a bit of breathing room which is why the white house may not have shot down the plan today-- even though they, of course, prefer a long-term extension of the debt ceiling, not just three months. >> pelley: nancy, thanks. president obama is about to begin his s
in this coming fight over the debt ceiling. in a big shift today, house republicans said they will vote to lift the limit for three months, but on the condition that the senate passes a budget. wall street liked this idea. the dow finished up almost 54 points to hit its highest closing level since december 10th of '07. nasdaq finished with a small loss. s&p 500 was up 5 points. also at five-year highs. >>> in washington tonight, it's starting to feel like a city that's about to host an inauguration. for the 57th time in the history of our republic, and host hundreds of thousands of people on a cold monday in january. our white house correspondent, peter alexander, is in lafayette park across from the white house, in front of the reviewing constant tonight. peter, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you. those are the best seats in the house, for a variety of reasons, including the fact they have heat. that's where the president and the first family will be watching monday's parade. the second obama inaugural is expected to draw roughly a third of the nearly 2 million people who ca
on lifting the debt ceiling. majority leader eric cantor said today republicans want an interim measure to provide about three more months of borrowing authority. the bill would not mandate immediate spending cuts, as house speaker john boehner earlier promised. instead, it would force congress to pass a budget or go without being paid. the government could reach the current debt ceiling by mid-february. ray nagin, the mayor of new orleans during hurricane katrina, has been indicted on charges for corruption. a federal grand jury accused him today of bribery, wire fraud, and money laundering while in office. nagin was the city's mayor from 2002 until 2010. two former new orleans officials and two businessmen have already pleaded guilty in the case. u.s. attorney general eric holder today defended president obama's moves to curb gun violence. the president signed 23 executive orders this week, calling for such things as more research into gun violence. today, in washington, holder told the u.s. conference of mayors that there's no question the orders are legal. >> now let me be very clea
a vote that will delay the debt ceiling for three months. so what they are doing, if you really look at house republicans who took the majority two years ago, they did it standing on principle for pretty much every squirmish. it seems that they are becoming a bit more sophisticated, rather, but their understanding, it seems, is that you have to pick your battles. losing credit ratings and so forth, that's not a smart battle to wage. look at some of the most conservative members of the house talking to deirdre walsh at the end of their retreat for three days about picking their battles in a better way. >> deal with the smaller ones first, maybe build up a little momentum, credibility, not only with the credit markets but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of th
attention. and that debt ceiling crisis may be delayed until the spring. the house is reportedly getting set to vote on a three-month extension until next week and what that does is sets up a big fight on budget and spending cuts which could embroil the economy and stock market in a new round of uncertainty but it kicks that can down the road, so is that why stocks are a bit tempered today? we'll take a look at that. the dow right now up 12 points. we are flirting with those five and a half year highs, 13,610 and change would be that five and a half year high so we're just pleau that right now. the nasdaq down another eight points at the moment at 3127 and technology among the groups suffering today. the s&p, again, here we go again. any positive close for the standard & poor's 500 would be another five and a half year high for the s&p. let's take a closer look at the markets in today's closing bell exchange with our guests. andres, you and i were talking about the markets earlier. what do you think? getting ahead of ourselves with the rallies we've had so far this year. >> earnings matter,
with the people that say tax reform is going to lose out because of scheduling need to deal with the debt screaming and the -- ceiling and the sequesters. house republicans concerned if they do anything about tax reform. they may leave it open to the senate and not taking action and taken the vote for no reason. are you optimistic? >> first of all, i have -- we have to reself the debt crisis in terms of sequestration. and in term of the full, faith, and credit in the next six weeks. we aren't going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that i think cannot be basically moved for what we need to do in the next six weeks. that will leave us adequate time to tackling the longer range problems. we're not going tackle tax reform in the next six weeks. we need to essentially deal with the sequestration, specially find a balanced approach that is going to raise a trillion dollars or close to. so that's why i have some optimism because we need to face up to the next six weeks, resolve it, and -- [inaudible] >> rick. [inaudible] by conflict -- i want to ask you about
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)